The Constitution and the Trump Presidency

This week Chicago-Kent faculty, students and staff observed Constitution Day 2017 with a panel discussion featuring Dean Harold Krent and Professors Sheldon Nahmod, Mark Rosen and Carolyn Shapiro. Professor Christopher Schmidt moderated the panel discussion and open Q&A following their presentations.

Constitution Day 2017 AudienceThis panel represented the range of constitutional experts at Chicago-Kent. Each faculty member was asked by the moderator to emphasize issues they saw as the most relevant, important, or pressing issues related to the Constitution and the Trump presidency so far.

The full event was video recorded – you can watch it in our YouTube playlist or find the individual videos with summaries and questions below. Continue reading “The Constitution and the Trump Presidency”

Recap: ACS Congressional Forum

The American Constitution Society hosted “Congressional Forum: Holding the President Accountable” at Chicago-Kent on May 31, 2017.  The event featured a fast-paced discussion from a distinguished panel, including Congresswoman Schakowsky, constitutional legal scholars and leaders from the American Constitution Society.

If you weren’t able to attend in person, we’ve gathered the social media coverage and videos from the event here so you can explore the many topics they discussed, from checks and balances to congressional investigations and pushback on executive orders for immigration.

ACSLP Congressional Forum: Holding the President Accountable
Panelists for ACSLP Congressional Forum

Videos

Video of the program has been excerpted by speaker and organized into a playlist, but you can also find the full length video here(You can access the playlist using the three-bar “hamburger” menu in the upper left corner of the video frame below.)

Social Recap

A number of the attendees at this event shared their reactions and photos via Twitter and other social media – you can browse through this Storify list to read their personal recaps:
Continue reading “Recap: ACS Congressional Forum”

Professor Shapiro discusses the prospect of SCOTUS reviewing President Trump’s EO on immigration on “Chicago Tonight”

Professor Carolyn Shapiro was a guest panelist on WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight” on May 30, 2017, to discuss the prospect of the U.S. Supreme Court reviewing president Trump’s second executive order on immigration. The executive order, which would temporarily ban travelers from six predominantly Muslim countries, is blocked by an injunction recently upheld by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. Professor Shapiro also commented on cases on the Supreme Court docket related to gerrymandering and whether religious institutions have a right to receive government funds.

May 31 Event: “Congressional Forum: Holding the President Accountable”

The American Constitution Society hosted this program with a distinguished panel to discuss a wide range of topics germane to the Trump administration. These included immigration, separation-of-powers issues with the Russia investigations, the judicial vacancy crisis, and how lawyers can use their law degrees to help address these issues.

Panelists:

  • The Honorable Jan Schakowsky, U.S. Representative for Illinois’ 9th Congressional District – @janschakowsky
  • Caroline Fredrickson, President, The American Constitution Society for Law & Policy – @crfredrickson
  • Aziz Huq, Frank and Bernice J. Greenberg Professor of Law at the University of Chicago
  • Steven Schwinn, Associate Professor & Director, Clinical Programs Professor, John Marshall Law School and Member of the ACS Chicago Lawyer Chapter Board of Advisors – @sschwinn
  • Geoffrey R. Stone, the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, Co-Chair of the Chicago Lawyer Chapter Board of Advisors and Member of ACS’s National Board of Advisors – @stone_geoffrey
Moderated by:
  • Amy M. Gardner, Director of Lawyer Chapters, The American Constitution Society for Law & Policy

 

 

When Healthcare Meets Politics

A discussion on the proposed replacement of the ACA (Obamacare) and the possible benefits and consequences of these changes to our healthcare system:

  • What will this mean not only at a federal level but for the state of Illinois?
  • What impact will these changes have on individuals with employer-provided insurance?
  • Who is the most at risk?

These questions and more will be addressed when we discuss what happens when healthcare meets politics.

Panelists at "When Healthcare Meets Politics"

Panelists include:

Continue reading “When Healthcare Meets Politics”

April 27 Event Announcement: “Law, Democracy, and the Right to Vote”

Join us for “Law, Democracy, and the Right to Vote” on Thursday, April 27. In this panel discussion, civil rights and advocacy experts will discuss the historical developments of the Voting Rights Act, gerrymandering, voter disenfranchisement, access to the polls, ID laws and more. We will address the experiences and burdens on the right to vote and make sure you know your rights. 

PANELISTS

  • Ryan Cortazar, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under the Law, @RZCortazar
  • Anthony Kreis, Chicago-Kent College of Law, @AnthonyMKreis
  • Ed Mullen, Bucktown Law, @edmullen3
  • Rebecca Reynolds, formerly with Chicago Votes, @beckyrey

Continue reading “April 27 Event Announcement: “Law, Democracy, and the Right to Vote””

Gaming Out the Nuclear Option

By Professor Carolyn Shapiro

Going nuclear may serve Republicans today, but in the long term, it may do more for Democrats. Today, in response to a Democratic filibuster of Judge Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the Supreme Court, the Republicans voted to eliminate the 60-vote threshold to end debate on a Supreme Court nomination. The Republicans have an immediate victory here: Justice Gorsuch will be sitting on the Supreme Court before its oral arguments scheduled for later this month. But in the long run, the elimination of the filibuster may help Democrats more than Republicans when it comes to Supreme Court appointments. (I’m not alone in thinking about unintended consequences here. Nate Silver of 538.com has an extensive piece today about how Republicans have generally used the filibuster more effectively than Democrats to block legislation and arguing that eroding its power may thus advantage Democrats in areas beyond the Supreme Court.)

Continue reading “Gaming Out the Nuclear Option”

Should Democrats Filibuster the Gorsuch Nomination? Pro & Con

By Professor Christopher Schmidt

Here are the arguments for why Senate Democrats should filibuster:

  1. They need to protest what Republicans did to Judge Garland’s nomination last year. Democrats need to take extraordinary action to make it clear the extreme wrong of the Republican refusal to hold hearings.
  2. Judge Gorsuch will be such a conservative justice that Democrats need to do all they can to try to stop his nomination.
  3. The Base. The progressive base and liberal pressure groups are energized and are demanding that Democratic senators do all they can to stop the nomination. Even if a filibuster is unlikely to prevent Gorsuch from taking his seat, it could be seen as a partial victory and might further energize the base for future battles.
  4. Long Game. The most likely consequence of a filibuster—i.e., the “nuclear option” of a Senate rules change that eliminates the filibuster for Supreme Court nominations—is not as bad as it sounds. A straight majority vote process might even allow a future Democratic-controlled Senate to get a more liberal justice onto the Court.

Continue reading “Should Democrats Filibuster the Gorsuch Nomination? Pro & Con”

The Gorsuch Report—Going Nuclear?

By Professor Christopher Schmidt

It’s showdown week for the Gorsuch nomination. Today, the Senate Judiciary Committee debates and votes on the nominee. Democratic committee members scored a minor victory after the hearings had concluded when they were able to head off the effort of Republican committee members to have a quick vote on Gorsuch. The Democrats asked for more time so they could receive and review written responses to questions posed by the senators. The Committee vote on Gorsuch today is expected to fall along party lines (11 Republicans in support; 9 Democrats opposed).

Then the real fireworks are expected when the nomination comes to the full Senate.

Continue reading “The Gorsuch Report—Going Nuclear?”

“Public Protest and the Law” Panel Discussion

What rules do the police need to follow when interacting with protesters? What are the privacy laws related to police body cams and protester-created videos?

“Public Protest and the Law,” a two-hour panel discussion among civil rights and advocacy experts held at Chicago-Kent College of Law on March 2, 2017, addressed First Amendment rights as they relate to protests, local protest permit laws and how they relate to spontaneous protests, issues undocumented immigrant and non-citizen protesters might face if arrested, proposed legislation to curb protester rights, and more.

Panelists:

Continue reading ““Public Protest and the Law” Panel Discussion”