Category Archives: Criminal Law

This Day in Supreme Court History—January 11, 2000

On this day in 2000, United States v. Morrison was argued in front of the Supreme Court. Morrison was a constitutional challenge to a section of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (VAWA) that provided a civil remedy for victims of gender-motivated violence by allowing them to sue for damages in federal court. The … Continue reading This Day in Supreme Court History—January 11, 2000

This Day In Supreme Court History—January 10, 1984

On this day in 1984, Strickland v. Washington was argued at the Supreme Court. This case considered what it meant for a criminal defendant to have the “effective assistance” of counsel, which the Court had previously ruled the Sixth Amendment required. David Washington waived his right to a jury trial and pleaded guilty to three … Continue reading This Day In Supreme Court History—January 10, 1984

Scalia, the Court, and the End of the Death Penalty

Justice Scalia made news last week for his remarks during an appearance at Rhodes College.  In addition to expressing in his characteristically blunt way his frustration with the Court’s same-sex marriage opinion from last term, he predicted that the Court was on its way to striking down the death penalty.  The prediction got a good … Continue reading Scalia, the Court, and the End of the Death Penalty

Riley v. California: Behind the Decision

On April 25, the Supreme Court held that police must obtain a warrant to search the digital contents of an arrestee’s phone. The unanimous ruling raised many interesting points, and so Professor Douglas Godfrey (IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law) sat down to explain the decision. The decision was for both Riley v. California and United States v. Wurie.

Court Agrees to Hear Double Jeopardy Challenge

Case: Blueford v. Arkansas The Court today agreed to hear a double jeopardy case, specifically addressing whether an accused murderer can be retried on all counts if the first jury deadlocks on lesser charges but acquits him of a greater offense. The case is No. 10-1320, Blueford v. Arkansas. You can read the full background … Continue reading Court Agrees to Hear Double Jeopardy Challenge