Category Archives: OT 2014

This Day in Supreme Court History—April 12, 1937

On this day in 1937, the Supreme Court handed down NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel, a cornerstone of what became known as the “Constitutional Revolution of 1937.” In National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, ten former workers of Jones & Laughlin Steel brought a suit against the company, asserting that … Continue reading This Day in Supreme Court History—April 12, 1937

Should Democrats Filibuster the Gorsuch Nomination? Pro & Con

Here are the arguments for why Senate Democrats should filibuster: Garland. They need to protest what Republicans did to Judge Garland’s nomination last year. Democrats need to take extraordinary action to make it clear the extreme wrong of the Republican refusal to hold hearings. Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch will be such a conservative justice that Democrats … Continue reading Should Democrats Filibuster the Gorsuch Nomination? Pro & Con

This Day in Supreme Court History—April 3, 1962

On this day in 1962, Engel v. Vitale, a seminal religious liberty case, was argued at the Supreme Court. In 1951, the Board of Regents for the State of New York authorized a prayer for recitation at the start of each school day. The prayer read: “Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence upon Thee, and beg Thy … Continue reading This Day in Supreme Court History—April 3, 1962

Why the Democrats Lost the Gorsuch Hearings

Judge Neil Gorsuch is headed toward Senate confirmation. Ever since the President made the nomination, it has been hard to imagine another outcome. Short of some scandalous skeletons emerging from Judge Gorsuch’s closet—a closet that, by all accounts, appears safely devoid of anything of much interest—this is a loss Democrats expected. The Republicans have the … Continue reading Why the Democrats Lost the Gorsuch Hearings

This Day in Supreme Court History—March 27, 2013

On this day in 2013, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in United States v. Windsor, a landmark case in the evolution of marriage equality rights. Windsor was a challenge to a provision of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) of 1996. The provision at issue stated that under federal law, “marriage” and “spouse” … Continue reading This Day in Supreme Court History—March 27, 2013

The Gorsuch Report—Confirmation Hearings (Halftime Report)

It was a long day for Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. For over eleven hours yesterday, the 10th Circuit judge answered questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee. Each senator had thirty minutes to question Judge Gorsuch (or, as was often the case, to deliver monologues with question marks at the end). The second day of … Continue reading The Gorsuch Report—Confirmation Hearings (Halftime Report)

The Gorsuch Report—Confirmation Hearings Day 1

It’s finally here. Today, the Senate Judiciary Committee begins its confirmation hearing for Judge Neil Gorsuch to become the next associate justice of the Supreme Court. Judge Gorsuch has been busy during the seven weeks since President Trump nominated him. He has met with 72 senators. He has been studying, going over his own opinions … Continue reading The Gorsuch Report—Confirmation Hearings Day 1

Weekly Roundup – January 7, 2017

Did you miss your Supreme Court news this week? Let our Weekly Roundup help. (To stay on top of the latest Supreme Court happenings, follow @ISCOTUS on Twitter.) The Supreme Court held its first Conference of the new year on Friday, January 6, and orders are expected to be released on Monday morning. The Court … Continue reading Weekly Roundup – January 7, 2017

Chicago Tonight discussion on the Supreme Court under President Trump

Professor and ISCOTUS codirector Carolyn Shapiro appeared on Chicago Tonight last evening, with other panelists, to discuss the future of the Supreme Court under President Trump. The panelists agreed that filling Justice Scalia’s seat is unlikely to lead to much change in the Court’s ideological balance.  But even with additional nominations, Shapiro  is “skeptical that … Continue reading Chicago Tonight discussion on the Supreme Court under President Trump

The Week Ahead – November 14, 2016

The Supreme Court’s scheduled activity this week consists of orders from its November 10 conference, issued on Monday, November 14. The Court did not add any new cases to its docket. It did not act on a number of cases that had been relisted, suggesting that those cases are still under consideration, that the Court … Continue reading The Week Ahead – November 14, 2016