Category Archives: Term

Teaching About the Supreme Court

Although the beginning of the Supreme Court’s October Term 2017 is still over a month away, at many law schools, the fall semester is up and running. Here at Chicago-Kent, I’m teaching a course I developed several years ago called “Supreme Court Review.” It’s a terrific course to teach. The subject matter—the past, present, and … Continue reading Teaching About the Supreme Court

This Day in Supreme Court History—August 8, 1793

On this day in 1793, the Supreme Court sent a letter to President George Washington denying his request for the Court’s opinion regarding certain legal issues pertaining to the nation’s relations with France. This letter set a critical precedent for the newly created Court, which the justices have never abandoned: the Court will only issue opinions in … Continue reading This Day in Supreme Court History—August 8, 1793

Week of June 26, 2017 at the Court – End of Term

The biggest news this week was the Supreme Court’s  decision to hear the travel ban cases while partially staying the lower court injunctions. The Court had before it two petitions for certiorari filed by the government — one from the Fourth Circuit and one from the Ninth Circuit, which had both upheld lower courts’ injunctions … Continue reading Week of June 26, 2017 at the Court – End of Term

Weekly Roundup – June 23, 2017

After announcing five opinions on Monday (discussed here), the Supreme Court issued three more on Thursday and another three on Friday. This coming Monday, June 26, is the last announcement day currently scheduled, and there are six cases still to be decided. And it is possible (although not overwhelmingly likely at this point) that the … Continue reading Weekly Roundup – June 23, 2017

This Week at the Court – Week of June 19, 2017

The Supreme Court hit the ground running this week, handing down five opinions, one per curiam, and releasing its order list from its June 15 conference. Matal v. Tam (previously named Lee v. Tam) stems from a challenge by an Asian-American band wishing to trademark their band name, “The Slants,” with the U.S. Patent and … Continue reading This Week at the Court – Week of June 19, 2017

This Week at the Court – Week of June 12, 2017

On Monday, Justice Gorsuch announced his first opinion as a Justice of the Supreme Court in Henson v. Santander Consumer USA, Inc.,, was the first of four opinions the Court announced from the bench. In Henson, the plaintiffs alleged that Santander had violated the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) in its communications with individuals … Continue reading This Week at the Court – Week of June 12, 2017

This Week at the Court – June 5, 2017

On Monday, the Court summarily affirmed a finding of liability in yet another voting rights case from North Carolina, issued four opinions, and granted certiorari in one case. In North Carolina v. Covington, the Court summarily affirmed a three-judge district court’s holding that the state legislative map was an unconstitutional racial gerrymander. (Only two weeks … Continue reading This Week at the Court – June 5, 2017

Weekly Roundup – June 2, 2017

On Thursday evening, in the case now captioned Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP), the Trump Administration formally asked the Supreme Court to review the Fourth Circuit’s decision upholding a Maryland District Court’s preliminary injunction of President Trump’s second travel ban Executive Order. The government also asked the Court to stay the preliminary injunction … Continue reading Weekly Roundup – June 2, 2017

This Week at the Court – Week of May 29, 2017

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court issued three opinions and announced that will hear a case involving voter registration next Term. In one of the three opinions the Court issued on Tuesday, County of Los Angeles v. Mendez, the Court held, in a unanimous (8-0) opinion by Justice Alito that an officer’s reasonable use of force … Continue reading This Week at the Court – Week of May 29, 2017

Weekly Roundup – May 25, 2017

On Monday, in Cooper v. Harris, the Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision to strike down two North Carolina congressional districts as unconstitutional racial gerrymanders. Since the opinion’s release, the case has continued to garner attention. Linda Greenhouse of the New York Times argues that Cooper highlights the Court’s role “as a forum for … Continue reading Weekly Roundup – May 25, 2017