Category Archives: Justices

The Gorsuch Report—Week 4

It’s been over three weeks since Judge Neil Gorsuch was nominated to become a U.S. Supreme Court associate justice. Here’s the latest news on his confirmation process. Among the senators who will vote on his appointment, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer remains Gorsuch’s most vocal critic. The Democratic senator from New York previously took to the … Continue reading The Gorsuch Report—Week 4

The Gorsuch Report—Week 3

Here are the latest headlines for President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch.   The Clerks Speak Out. Judge Gorsuch’s past law clerks signed a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee declaring that his independence “will never waiver.” (The only former Gorsuch clerks who did not sign are two currently clerking at the Supreme Court.) … Continue reading The Gorsuch Report—Week 3

Remembering Justice Scalia–One Year Later

Just over a year ago, the nation lost Justice Antonin Scalia, one of the most significant members of the Supreme Court in recent history. “Nino Scalia will go down in history as one of the most transformational Supreme Court justices of our nation,” Justice Kagan stated. Justice Breyer described him as a “legal titan.” Antonin … Continue reading Remembering Justice Scalia–One Year Later

A Public Interview with Justice Kagan

Post by Anna Jirschele, ISCOTUS Editor and 2L at Chicago-Kent College of Law. The annual Equal Justice Works Conference and Career Fair took place last weekend in Washington, D.C., and the guest of honor was the Supreme Court’s very own Justice Elena Kagan. Often interviews with Supreme Court justices center on the work of the Supreme … Continue reading A Public Interview with Justice Kagan

This Day in Supreme Court History: October 5, 1953

On this day in 1953, Earl Warren was sworn in as the 14th Chief Justice of the United States. Warren replaced Chief Justice Fred Vinson, who had died of a heart attack on September 8, 1953. When President Dwight Eisenhower nominated the Republican governor of California to become the next Chief Justice, he praised Warren … Continue reading This Day in Supreme Court History: October 5, 1953

How to Think About Justice Ginsburg’s Trump Comments

The trial of Justice Ginsburg for violations of judicial propriety has concluded, the jury has deliberated, and the defendant has been found guilty. The Justice was wrong to publicly and repeatedly attack Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. The Justice has her defenders of course. Some simply believe Ginsburg can do no wrong. Some argue normal … Continue reading How to Think About Justice Ginsburg’s Trump Comments

Justice Scalia and the Transformation of First Amendment Jurisprudence

Post by Steven Heyman, Professor of Law at IIT Chicago-Kent School of Law.  Antonin Scalia served on the federal bench for over three decades, first on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (1982-86) and then on the U.S. Supreme Court (1986-2016).  This period coincided with a remarkable shift in our … Continue reading Justice Scalia and the Transformation of First Amendment Jurisprudence

The Supreme Court Vacancy: Constitutional and Political Issues

Post by Vinay Harpalani, J.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Law at Savannah Law School. Follow him on twitter at @VinayHarpalani. With Justice Antonin Scalia’s passing on February 13, the U.S. Supreme Court is at a crossroads.  America is also currently in the midst of a contentious Presidential primary season, particularly on the Republican side. In the coming months … Continue reading The Supreme Court Vacancy: Constitutional and Political Issues

How Scalia Played With Fire

The following opinion piece by Carolyn Shapiro, “How Scalia played with fire,” was posted February 16, 2016, on cnn.com. The late Justice Antonin Scalia has been justly praised for his tremendous intellect, his resounding influence on the law and his supremely accessible opinions. And since his death Saturday, many commentators have noted his sincere, long friendship with liberal … Continue reading How Scalia Played With Fire

Scalia, the Court, and the End of the Death Penalty

Justice Scalia made news last week for his remarks during an appearance at Rhodes College.  In addition to expressing in his characteristically blunt way his frustration with the Court’s same-sex marriage opinion from last term, he predicted that the Court was on its way to striking down the death penalty.  The prediction got a good … Continue reading Scalia, the Court, and the End of the Death Penalty