Research in Progress – February 2014

Lori Andrews is writing a law review article on the increasing pervasiveness of gamification in employment and its implications for labor law. She is also writing a policy paper about the legal issues created by webcams.

 

Oxford University Press offered William Birdthistle a contract to publish a book tentatively entitled, The Money Management Empire.

 

Martin Malin continues, along with Professor Sara Slinn of Osdgoode Hall Law School, York University, and Professor Jon Werner of the University of Wisconsin, to work on their project, An Empirical Comparison on the Handling of Statutory Human Rights Claims in Labour Arbitration in Ontario and before the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. Students from Chicago-Kent and Osgoode Hall are completing the coding of the cases and the professors are beginning the quantitative analysis. Professor Malin and his co-authors are scheduled to present preliminary results at the National Academy of Arbitrators Annual Meeting in May 2014 and at a meeting of The Labor Law Group at Cornell University in late June 2014.

 

In December 2013, Nancy Marder completed the book chapter entitled Jurors and Juries that she was invited to write for a book called Wiley Handbook of Law and Society. The chapter traces the main theoretical developments and controversies concerning the jury over the past few decades and identifies paths for jury scholarship in the future.

 

In February 2014, Professor Marder continued working on her article Jurors and Social Media: Is a Fair Trial Still Possible?  The article will be published in volume 67 of SMU Law Review and will be highlighted in the March 2014 issue of Chicago-Kent’s Faculty Perspectives.

 

In January 2014, Professor Marder wrote an essay on jury instructions that she was invited to contribute as part of a volume called Speaking of Language and Law: Conversations on the Work of Peter Tiersma. The volume, a compilation of essays in honor of law professor and linguist Peter Tiersma, will be published by Oxford University Press in 2014.

 

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