• Multimedia

    Posts featuring audio and video content.

    Schmidt on Hobby Lobby Decision

    by  • June 30, 2014 • Faculty Commentary, Multimedia • 0 Comments

    On June 30, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., ruling that the Affordable Care Act’s birth control mandate does not require closely held, for-profit companies to provide contraceptive coverage to its employees if the companies’ owners voice religious objections.

    In this video, Professor and ISCOTUS director Christopher Schmidt discusses the specifics of the case, the opinion, and the dissent, as well as the implications the decision could have for the future.

    Find the video on YouTube here.

    Godfrey on Cell Phone Search & Seizure Decision

    by  • June 26, 2014 • Faculty Commentary, Multimedia • 0 Comments

    On June 25, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a single decision in two cases on cell phone search and seizure—Riley v. California and U.S. v. Wurie. In a major victory for digital privacy rights, the Court ruled that police officers must obtain a warrant to access information on the cell phone of an arrestee.

    In this ISCOTUS video, Professor Douglas Godfrey discusses the case and its implications for the future.

    Find the video on YouTube here.

     

    Lee on ABC v. Aereo

    by  • June 25, 2014 • Faculty Commentary, Multimedia • 0 Comments

    On June 25, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its opinion in ABC v. Aereo, an important copyright case featuring the broadcast TV giant and a small Internet startup. The Court ruled against Aereo, claiming that Aereo’s services—which allowed users to watch major network TV programs over the Internet—had infringed upon the rights of the programs’ copyright holders.

    In this ISCOTUS video, Professor Edward Lee discusses the case and what the decision means for Aereo’s and other tech companies’ futures.

    For more, see Prof. Lee’s “Inside the Case” feature on Aereo.

    Find the video on YouTube here.

    Tarlock on EPA Cases

    by  • June 24, 2014 • Faculty Commentary, Multimedia • 0 Comments

    Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA—a consolidation of cases brought by a number of states and industries opposed to the EPA’s regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.

    In this ISCOTUS video, Professor A. Dan Tarlock, an internationally-recognized authority on environmental law issues, explains the details of the case and the implications of the decision.

    Find the video on YouTube here.

    The School of American Law for the Caucasus Region

    by  • June 18, 2014 • Multimedia • 0 Comments

    [Via IIT Chicago-Kent YouTube Channel]


    The Class of 2014 graduates from Chicago-Kent’s School of American Law in Tbilisi, Georgia, on May 23, 2014.

    Chicago-Kent and Knowledge Management Group Georgia /KMG Georgia LLC have organized the School of American Law for the whole Caucasus and Turkey, which is directed by Chicago-Kent professor Richard Warner. The School of American law offers 120 hours of instruction in English on topics in American law in Tbilisi, Georgia with cooperation of Knowledge Management Group. Topics vary from year to year, but typically include: Introduction to American Legal System, International Business Transactions, Online Contracting, Legal Writing & Legal Research, Antitrust Law, IP and Patent Law, E-Commerce, Marketing & Advertising, Privacy & Date Protection Law, Corporate Responsibility, International Criminal Law.

    See more at http://uslawstudy.org/.

    Find the video on YouTube here.

    Lee—SOPA and The Free Internet Project

    by  • June 17, 2014 • Faculty Commentary, Multimedia, Scholarship • 0 Comments

    [Via IIT Chicago-Kent YouTube Channel]


    The concept of a free Internet came into the spotlight with the public protests against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and other proposed federal legislation, which were defeated in Congress in 2012. Professor Edward Lee, who thoroughly researched the fight for Internet freedom for his recent book on the subject, discusses the current state of the movement for a free Internet. He also discusses his new nonprofit, The Free Internet Project, and its plans to become a resource for free internet movements around the world.

    For more information about Professor Lee’s book, The Fight for the Future, visit http://bit.ly/19IsJN5.

    For more information about The Free Internet Project, visit http://thefreeinternetproject.org.

    For more information about Professor Lee’s work and research interests, visit http://bit.ly/1slSOis.

    Find the video on YouTube here.

    The American Bankruptcy Institute’s Commission on Chapter 11 Reform

    by  • June 4, 2014 • Faculty Commentary, Multimedia, Scholarship • 0 Comments

    Walters_Adrian thumbBy Adrian Walters [reposted from The Walters Way]


    Students and practitioners with an interest in bankruptcy law may be interested in the work of the American Bankruptcy Institute’s Commission to Study the Reform of Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. The Commission’s study is premised on the concern that Chapter 11, originally enacted in 1978, is now significantly out of date.  One particular concern is that Chapter 11 in the general run of cases has become little more than a glorified nationwide foreclosure process that functions principally for the benefit of secured creditors at the expense of debtors and other stakeholders.

    In April, I was lucky to be invited to speak at a symposium jointly organized by the American Bankruptcy Institute and the University of Illinois that addressed the implications of secured creditor capture of Chapter 11.  My main message to reformers in the US, drawing on secured creditors’ responses to legislative erosion of their rights in the United Kingdom, was that lenders will invariably adjust to legislative changes that affect their interests.  Accordingly, the designers of any new bankruptcy law must not lose sight of the tendency of powerful constituencies to undermine reform efforts, whether through the political process, or by other means, such as transactional innovation.

    An early draft of my written paper is available here.

    And you can watch a recording of my presentation at the symposium and the follow-up commentary provided by Ted Janger of Brooklyn Law School here.