• Archive for May, 2014

    Weekly Faculty in the News, 5/23/14

    by  • May 23, 2014 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    A roundup of faculty appearances in news sources and media from the last week, 5/15/14 to 5/23/14.

    5/16 – Dean Harold Krent was quoted in a Chicago Daily Law Bulletin article on the American Bar Association’s formation of a task force to investigate new ways of financing legal education (“ABA task force in search of a new funding formula,” behind paywall).

    5/16 – Dean Harold Krent appeared in an Al Jazeera America video on Chicago Public School closures and institutional discrimination (“School closures creating modern form of segregation and unequal education”).

    Blogs:

    5/16Adrian Walters authored a new post on his blog, The Walters Way, about Professor Bernie Burk and his paper What’s New About the New Normal: The Evolving Market for New Lawyers in the 21st Century.

    5/21 – Chris Schmidt’s ISCOTUSnow essay on the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education was mentioned in SCOTUSblog’s Wednesday round-up.


    For more information, contact Gwendolyn Osborne, Director of Public Affairs, (312) 906-5251.

    Why Brown v. Board of Education Disappoints—And Why That’s Not All Bad

    by  • May 20, 2014 • Faculty Commentary • 0 Comments

    By Christopher Schmidt [reposted from ISCOTUSnow]


    Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court’s landmark 1954 school desegregation ruling, turned 60 this past week. This anniversary was much like previous ones, equal parts commemoration and lamentation. If there is a consistent theme to Brown anniversaries over the years, it is this: Brown promised much, but only partially delivered. Brown is a chronic underachiever. From the day it was announced, the Brown decision has been a repository of unmet expectations. Brown has always been both inspiration and disappointment. Indeed, they are two sides of the same coin.

    When Chief Justice Warren announced the Court’s ruling on May 17, 1954, civil rights activists embraced the momentous event with an outpouring of optimism. Thurgood Marshall, the NAACP lawyer who led the battle against segregation in the courts, predicted that within five years schools across the South would be desegregated. Walter White, NAACP executive director, told a mass meeting of civil rights activists: “If I had the skill of the artist, I would build a picture of the nine justices of the Supreme Court and of decent Americans, both Negro and white, marching forward with head high and shining eyes toward democracy.” In the rear of the picture, White continued, would be “three or four pathetic figures” who were “weeping and screaming, ‘I won’t let it happen!’” History was going to leave behind this “shrinking minority” of diehard segregationists.

    But reality came up far short of these inspired visions of a post-Brown future. In fact, Brown’s early performance came up short of even the most cautious of prognostications. (more…)

    Weekly Faculty in the News, 5/15/14

    by  • May 15, 2014 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    A roundup of faculty appearances in news sources and media from the last week, 5/8/14 to 5/15/14.

    5/8 – Carolyn Shapiro, who is currently on leave from Chicago-Kent as the Illinois Solicitor General, was profiled by the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin (“Law no longer an academic exercise for Shapiro,” behind paywall). The article highlights Shapiro’s education, legal experience, and academic research projects—including Chicago-Kent’s Institute on the Supreme Court of the United States, of which she is the founder and former director.

    Blogs:

    5/11The Conglomerate blog announced the program for the AALS Mid-year Meeting on Corporate and Financial Law, which will be held June 7-9 in Washington, D.C. William Birdthistle, along with four other law professors, will take part in a panel on teaching.

    5/13Ed Lee was featured in a Groupon People Blog post about an earlier talk Lee gave on his new book, The Fight for the Future, as part of the Groupon Presents Speaker Series.


    For more information, contact Gwendolyn Osborne, Director of Public Affairs, (312) 906-5251.

    Staudt on Legal Technology in the Public Interest

    by  • May 12, 2014 • Faculty Scholarship, Faculty Workshops/ Conferences, Multimedia • 0 Comments

    On May 2, 2014, CodeX – The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics hosted the second annual CodeX FutureLaw Conference, an event which focused on how technology is changing the landscape of the legal profession. The conference brought together “leading thinkers, entrepreneurs, investors and technologists that are experimenting and actively working to re-architect the future of the law” and addressed a variety of topics, including “technology’s impact on legal data ecosystems, … the health of virtual legal marketplaces, and emerging legal technologies within the realm of public interest law.”

    Along with Stephanie Kimbro (Center for Law Practice Technology and Curo Legal) and Phil Malone (Stanford), Chicago-Kent’s own Ronald Staudt took part in a panel discussion entitled “Legal Technology in the Public Interest.” The conference website outlined the panel with this:

    Lawyers and companies alike tend to focus on the commercial aspects of legal technology. However, legal technology also holds the potential to improve access to justice and reinvent some of the classic problems that have dogged public interest legal services. This panel examines the latest, and raises case studies that explore the use of these technologies to produce broader societal good.

    Prof. Staudt talked about his work with the Center for Access to Justice & Technology (CAJT)—a law school center using Internet resources to improve access to justice with special emphasis on building Web tools to support legal services advocates, pro bono volunteers and pro se litigants.

    A video of this panel is now available here.

    Weekly Faculty in the News, 5/8/14

    by  • May 8, 2014 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    A roundup of faculty appearances in news sources and media from the last week, 5/1/14 to 5/8/14.

    5/6 – Dean Harold Krent appeared on a panel on Chicago Tonight to discuss the decision in Town of Greece v. Galloway, the legislative prayer case before the Supreme Court of the United States this Term. Watch the video here.

    Blogs:

    5/6Chris Schmidt’s ISCOTUS video commentary on Town of Greece v. Galloway was mentioned in SCOTUSblog’s Tuesday round-up.

    5/8Sheldon Nahmod posted on section 1983 gun liability and the Child Safety Lock Act of 2005 at his blog, Nahmod Law.


    For more information, contact Gwendolyn Osborne, Director of Public Affairs, (312) 906-5251.

    Schmidt on Town of Greece v. Galloway

    by  • May 6, 2014 • Faculty Commentary, Multimedia • 0 Comments

    [Reposted from ISCOTUSnow]


    Town of Greece v. Galloway

    On May 5, 2014, the Supreme Court decided Town of Greece v. Galloway. The decision held that under the Establishment Clause, public prayer before a town council meeting was constitutional. Professor Christopher Schmidt explains the decision and its facets.

    For more on this case, please visit the Oyez Project/ISCOTUS Deep Dive.

    Find the video on YouTube here.

    Weekly Faculty in the News, 5/1/14

    by  • May 1, 2014 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    A roundup of faculty appearances in news sources and media from the last week, 4/24/14 to 5/1/14.

    4/27Richard Kling was quoted in a Chicago Tribune article on a sexual assault case involving social media (“Sexual assault case prompts consent questions”).

    4/30 – Dean Harold Krent was quoted in a press release on a new online course partnership between IIT, Chicago-Kent, and Integrated Education Solutions, a part of DeVry Education Group. According to the release, Chicago-Kent’s “online master’s degree program in intellectual property management and markets will soon begin accepting applications for the fall 2014 semester. The addition of the online option will allow students to select from three program start dates throughout the year, and to choose to pursue the degree part-time. Also in development at the college is a new online-only certificate program for regulatory compliance in financial markets.”

    Blogs:

    – Our faculty have been covering many of the recent oral arguments and decisions in cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. This week, Edward Lee and Christi Guerrini analyzed and made predictions in the intellectual property cases Nautilus v. Biosig Instruments and Limelight v. Akamai; both posts were highlighted in SCOTUSblog’s Wednesday and Thursday roundups, respectively. SCOTUSblog’s Thursday roundup also featured Dave Schwartz’s ISCOTUSnow video explaining the two cases.


    For more information, contact Gwendolyn Osborne, Director of Public Affairs, (312) 906-5251.

    Schwartz on Nautilus and Limelight

    by  • May 1, 2014 • Faculty Commentary, Multimedia • 0 Comments

    [Reposted from ISCOTUSnow]


    Cases: Nautilus, Inc. v. Biosig Instruments, Inc.Limelight Networks, Inc. v. Akamai Technologies, Inc.

    On April 28, 2014, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Nautilus, Inc. v. Biosig Instruments, Inc., and two days later, the Court heard argument in Limelight Networks, Inc. v. Akamai Technologies, Inc. These two patent cases have important implications for intellectual property law. Professor David Schwartz explains the issues and background of both cases.

    Find the video on YouTube here.