• Archive for August, 2013

    Weekly Faculty in the News, 8/29

    by  • August 29, 2013 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    A roundup of faculty appearances in news sources and media from the last week.

    8/19 – Dean Harold Krent was quoted in a Law 360 article on the barriers facing the American Bar Association’s plan to create a job corps for young lawyers (“Cash Crunch Could Keep ‘Legal Job Corps’ Grounded“).

    8/22 – ISCOTUSnow was featured in a list of the “top 6 civics apps for engaged citizens” selected by the ABA Division for Public Education. The list was prepared for the upcoming Law-Related Education Conference, to be held October 3-5 in Atalanta, Georgia.

    8/27 – Dean Krent was interviewed in a First Business video segment on Trump University, which is currently being sued for fraud by New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman.

    August 2013 Issue of Faculty News

    by  • August 27, 2013 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    What have our busy faculty members been up to over the summer? Read about their recent accomplishments and activities in the latest issue of Faculty News, which recounts this summer’s presentation and travel highlights, published scholarship, and in-progress research projects. This productive season saw the publication of at least 17 law review articles, 5 treatise and book updates, and 3 new books. Click here for more.

    Weekly Faculty in the News, 8/22

    by  • August 22, 2013 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    A roundup of faculty appearances in news sources and media from the last week.

    8/19 – Professor Evelyn Brody was quoted in a USA Today article on the ongoing IRS scandal (“IRS assailed from all sides for lack of transparency“).

    In addition, check out the following blog posts written by faculty this week:

    8/20 – “Two Post-Filarsky Private Individual Immunity Decisions in the Circuits,” posted by Sheldon Nahmod at Nahmod Law. Professor Nahmod unpacks two circuit decisions that deal with private individual immunity after the Supreme Court’s decision in Filarsky v. Delia, which ruled that “an individual hired by the government to work for it is indeed protected by qualified immunity, even though that individual does not work for the government on a permanent or full-time basis.”

    8/20 – “Coming Up At The Court – McCutcheon v. FEC,” posted at ISCOTUSnow. Professor Carolyn Shapiro previews an upcoming Supreme Court case which “challenges a limitation on the total amount of campaign donations an individual can give during any election cycle.”

    8/21 – “Teaching contract drafting,” posted by Adrian Walters at The Walters Way. In this installation of posts on the teaching of contract drafting, Professor Walters ruminates on how to design a successful “outcome-based” curriculum.

    Chicago-Kent Research Paper Series No. 5.8

    by  • August 19, 2013 • Faculty Scholarship • 0 Comments

    The Chicago-Kent Research Paper Series (RPS) is an SSRN ejournal publication, distributed monthly, that highlights new abstracts, works in progress, and recently published articles by Chicago-Kent faculty.

    The latest edition (5.8) of the RPS was distributed today. This edition includes the following articles:

    – Are World Trading Rules Passé?, 53 Va. J. Int’l L. 623 (2013), by Sungjoon Cho (coauthored with Claire Kelly, Brooklyn Law School)

    – DesiCrit: Theorizing the Racial Ambiguity of South Asian Americans, 69 N.Y.U. Ann. Surv. Am. L. (forthcoming 2013), by Vinay Harpalani

    – Protecting Workers as a Matter of Principle: A South American View of U.S. Work Law, working paper (2013), by César Rosado Marzán (coauthored with Sergio Gamonal C., Adolfo Ibáñez University)

    – Pre- and Post-Judgment Review of Summary Judgment Denials After Ortiz v. Jordan — A Wider and Deeper Look, working paper (2013), by Joan Steinman

    – Big Data and the “New” Privacy Tradeoff, working paper (2013), by Richard Warner (coauthored with Robert H. Sloan, UIC)

    Click here to see the abstract page for the Series, and be sure to subscribe to the ejournal to receive regular Chicago-Kent scholarship updates.

    Weekly Faculty in the News, 8/15

    by  • August 15, 2013 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    A roundup of faculty appearances in news sources and media from the last week.

    8/11 – Professor Todd Haugh was quoted in a Chicago Tribune story about possible sentences for former Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. and his wife, former Chicago Alderman Sandi Jackson (“Jacksons’ fate a question of time“). Prof. Haugh was also interviewed twice by WBBM-AM and once by WLS-AM about the Jacksons’ sentencing.

    8/13Social Media Week Chicago opened registration for its free, week-long conference (September 23-27), at which Professor Ed Lee will present a talk on his new book, The Fight for the Future: How People Defeated Hollywood and Saved the Internet—For Now. The book and event seek to explain how ordinary citizens used Facebook, Twitter, and other social media to organize and launch protests against SOPA and ACTA, two controversial copyright proposals in the United States and European Union that many feared would lead to Internet censorship.

    8/14 – Clinical Professor of Law Richard Kling was interviewed twice by WLS-TV Chicago about the sentencing of the Jacksons (“Illinoisans react to Jesse Jackson Jr., Sandi Jackson sentences” and “Jesse Jackson Jr., Sandi Jackson to be sentenced in Washington on Wednesday” [8/15]).

    Lee to Speak at Social Media Week Chicago

    by  • August 13, 2013 • Faculty Scholarship, Faculty Workshops/ Conferences • 0 Comments

    Free registration has just opened for this year’s Social Media Week Chicago, a conference that is part of the larger “leading media platform and worldwide event” with “local presence and global reach across five continents, including Europe, North America, South America, Africa and Asia.” The conference will take place the week of September 23-27 at various venues throughout the city, including the Tribune Tower, the Willis Tower, the Chicago Cultural Center, and DePaul University.

    On Wednesday, September 25, Chicago-Kent Professor Edward Lee will give a talk on his new book, The Fight for the Future: How People Defeated Hollywood and Saved the Internet—For Now (forthcoming this fall). Event details below.


    The Fight for the Future: How People Defeated Hollywood and Saved the Internet, For Now

    This event will explain how a grassroots movement involving millions of people was able to defeat money, politicians, Hollywood, and the copyright lobby, all in the name of a “free and open Internet.”

    People used Facebook, Twitter, and other social media to organize and launch protests against SOPA and ACTA, two controversial copyright proposals in the United States and European Union that many feared would lead to Internet censorship. The event will share some of the findings from Ed Lee’s forthcoming ebook (under the same title). Participants will learn how the Internet helped people fight for their Internet freedoms—and do the unthinkable in stopping powerful lobbyists and the entertainment industry in their effort to clamp down on online piracy at all costs.

    Location: Claudia Cassidy Theater at the Chicago Cultural Center, 77 E. Randolph St.
    Time: Wednesday, September 25, 2:30-3:30 pm

    Click here to register for this session.


    Don’t miss this free opportunity to hear Prof. Lee discuss his book’s trending themes. See the links below for more information.

    Announcing Money, Privacy, and Power Conference

    by  • August 12, 2013 • Faculty Workshops/ Conferences • 1 Comment

    moneyprivacypowerMoney, Privacy, and Power — September 10, 2013

    How should we react to Snowden’s revelations about NSA surveillance? There were immediate demands for explanation, accountability, and privacy protection, but so far we have seen little reasoned discussion of the risks and benefits of modern surveillance techniques. The conference Money, Privacy, and Power changes that on September 10, 2013 at Chicago-Kent College of Law. The conference focuses on money laundering and financial crime. This is a critical nexus at which concerns about terrorism, organized crime, and domestic crime combine in ways that call for international cooperation. Approximately thirty European regulators, policy makers, financial experts, and surveillance experts will attend. The aim is to point the way to facilitate international cooperation in ways that balance effective crime prevention with effective privacy protection.

    A key participant and sponsor is the European Commission funded project, HEMOLIA (Hybrid Enhanced Anti-Money Laundering Intelligence, Investigation, Incrimination and Alerts). HEMOLIA “is a new generation Anti-Money Laundering… investigation system which in addition to the traditional financial data makes extensive use of modern society’s huge telecom data source, thereby opening up a new dimension of capabilities to all Money Laundering fighters… and Financial Institutes.” (http://www.hemolia.eu). In a post-Snowden era, “extensive use” of telecommunications data raises acute privacy concerns. The HEMOLIA system incorporates privacy protective technology, and the description of that technology will initiate the discussion of privacy.

    US and European experts will discuss the pros and cons of such surveillance efforts in panels titled “The Detection and Control of Money Laundering” and “Beyond Money Laundering.” Chicago-Kent’s own Lori Andrews will moderate the final multi-national panel, “Money, Privacy, Power, and the Law,” which will focus exclusively on finding ways to promote international cooperation for effective crime prevention and privacy protection. See the full conference agenda here.

    Register for the free conference here.

    Weekly Faculty in the News, 8/8

    by  • August 8, 2013 • Faculty in the News • 0 Comments

    A roundup of faculty appearances in news sources and media from the last week.

    8/2 – Chicago-Kent’s upcoming conference on the Supreme Court’s intellectual property cases from last Term was highlighted by SCOTUSblog (“Event announcement: Intellectual property and the Term in review“). The Supreme Court IP Review will be held at Chicago-Kent on Thursday, September 26. For more information, visit the website here.

    8/2 – Clinical Professor of Law Daniel Coyne, who oversees the sexual violence clinic at the Chicago-Kent law offices, was quoted in a Christian Science Monitor article on Cleveland kidnapper Ariel Castro (“Cleveland kidnapper Ariel Castro blames porn addiction. Credible?“).

    8/6 – Dean Harold Krent was featured in an NBC 5 video on the lawsuit against Gov. Pat Quinn (“Quinn: Suspended Pay Suit “Going to Be a Landmark Case“).

     

    Here Come the Sun Wars: Trade Fights over Solar Panels

    by  • August 8, 2013 • Faculty Commentary • 0 Comments

    Cho_Sungjoon thumbBy Sungjoon Cho [originally posted at The National Law Journal]


    Undoubtedly, our existence depends on the sun. The whole ecological system, in which humans are part, would not sustain without it. One fascinating, albeit often underappreciated, fact is that this particular source of energy is fail-safe. From Day One, the sun has never neglected its job: It always rises in the morning. Also, it is limitless, at least for the next billion years.

    No wonder the sun has carried the symbol of power in the human history, ranging from the Pharaoh to the Louis XIV.

    Recently, however, earthlings have discovered new ways of basking in the sunshine: photovoltaic modules, also known as solar panels. They have somehow managed to extract electricity from the sun. Two main drawbacks from conventional energy sources — high prices and environmental degradation — have compelled humans to go back to the good old sun. What a happy marriage of modern science and business!

    The statistics on the recent growth of solar energy (photovoltaic power) are staggering. For the past five years, an average annual growth rate of global total solar power has been more than 50 percent. For Germany, solar power production increased from 24 megawatts (MW) in 2001 to 2, 022 MW in 2010. In the case of China, the number is even more astounding: only 3 MW in 2001 to 10, 852 MW in 2010! In the United States, the size of the solar cell and panel market has grown fivefold between 2006 and 2010. (more…)